Tag Archives: decolonial theory

Research and the elephant in the room – Έρευνα και ο ελέφαντας στο δωμάτιο

Standard

[η περίληψη στα ελληνικά ακολουθεί μετά από το αγγλικό κείμενο]

Research and the elephant in the room: encountering with violence in fieldwork concerning unpaid labour, in D.Wheatley (ed) (2019), Handbook of Research Methods on the Quality of Working Lives, Edward Elgar Publishing, pp. 79-93.

https://www.academia.edu/40629079/Research_and_the_elephant_in_the_room_encountering_with_violence_in_fieldwork_concerning_unpaid_labour

Abstract

The chapter explores violence, both systemic and incidental, that a social researcher may encounter during field research. The questions and anonymised cases used in this chapter stem from field research concerning public spaces of work related to, or organized by, social movements and grassroots initiatives. This work is usually defined as “unpaid” or “volunteering”, but also encapsulates work performed within arrangements of collective production beyond the paid–unpaid binary. Feminist and decolonial approaches are used to analyse ethical questions related to the stance a researcher may employ in social contexts where structural violence already exists (a patriarchal–racist–capitalist society) and where new incidents of physical or psychological violence may emerge and come to the researcher’s attention. The chapter employs the stance that when violence exists in or against a community this is a research finding that affects the integrity of the researcher, of the research, and the well-being of focus communities.

Keywords: violence, field research, unpaid labour, grassroots movements, research ethics

https://www.e-elgar.com/shop/handbook-of-research-methods-on-the-quality-of-working-lives

 

 

Έρευνα και ο ελέφαντας στο δωμάτιο: συναντώντας βία στην έρευνα πεδίου σχετικά με μη αμειβόμενη εργασία , στο συλλογικό τόμο [στα Αγγλικά] επιμέλειας D.Wheatley (2019), Handbook of Research Methods on the Quality of Working Lives, Edward Elgar Publishing, σελ. 79-93.

https://www.academia.edu/40629079/Research_and_the_elephant_in_the_room_encountering_with_violence_in_fieldwork_concerning_unpaid_labour

Περίληψη

Το κεφάλαιο αυτό εξετάζει τη βία, συστημική και περιστασιακή, την οποία μπορεί να συναντήσει μια/ένας κοινωνική/ός ερευνήτρια/-τής κατά τη διάρκεια της έρευνας πεδίου. Οι ερωτήσεις και τα περιστατικά που, έχοντας καταστεί ανώνυμα, χρησιμοποιούνται σε αυτό το κεφάλαιο, προέρχονται από επιτόπια έρευνα σχετικά με δημόσιους χώρους εργασίας που σχετίζονται με ή οργανώνονται από κοινωνικά κινήματα και πρωτοβουλίες βάσης. Αυτη η εργασία συνήθως ορίζεται ως «μη αμειβόμενη» ή «εθελοντισμός», αλλά περιλαμβάνει και την εργασία που εκτελείται στο πλαίσιο διευθετήσεων συλλογικής παραγωγής πέρα ​​από το δίπολο αμειβόμενης και μη αμειβόμενης εργασίας. Χρησιμοποιούνται φεμινιστικές και απο-αποικιακές προσεγγίσεις για την ανάλυση δεοντολογικών ζητημάτων που σχετίζονται με τη στάση που μπορεί να υιοθετήσει μια ερευνήτρια μέσα σε κοινωνικά πλαίσια όπου υπάρχει δομική βία (πατριαρχική-ρατσιστική-καπιταλιστική κοινωνία) και όπου νέα περιστατικά σωματικής ή ψυχολογικής βίας μπορεί να προκύψουν και να υποπέσουν στην αντίληψη της ερευνήτριας. Το κεφάλαιο αυτό υιοθετεί τη θέση ότι όταν υπάρχει βία μέσα σε ή κατά μιας κοινότητας, αυτό είναι ένα ερευνητικό εύρημα που εχει συνέπειες για την ακεραιότητα της ερευνήτριας, της έρευνας και για την ευημερία των κοινοτήτων στις οποίες η έρευνα εστιάζει.

Λέξεις-κλειδιά: βία, έρευνα πεδίου, μη αμειβόμενη εργασία, κινήματα βάσης, δεοντολογία της έρευνας

 

Many languages in one economy – Πολλές γλώσσες σε μία οικονομία

Standard

Slides from the paper presented at the International Conference “Communication across cultures: Challenges & prospects in the global context” Chania, 29.9.2018

https://www.academia.edu/38064996/Many_languages_in_one_economy_or_many_economies_in_one_language

Διαφάνειες από τη μελέτη που παρουσιάστηκε στο Διεθνές Συνέδριο “Επικοινωνία με διαφορετικές κουλτούρες: Προκλήσεις & προοπτικές στο παγκόσμιο περιβάλλον” Χανιά, 29.9.2018

https://www.academia.edu/38065008/%CE%A0%CE%BF%CE%BB%CE%BB%CE%AD%CF%82_%CE%B3%CE%BB%CF%8E%CF%83%CF%83%CE%B5%CF%82_%CF%83%CE%B5_%CE%BC%CE%AF%CE%B1_%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AF%CE%B1_%CE%AE_%CF%80%CE%BF%CE%BB%CE%BB%CE%AD%CF%82_%CE%BF%CE%B9%CE%BA%CE%BF%CE%BD%CE%BF%CE%BC%CE%AF%CE%B5%CF%82_%CF%83%CE%B5_%CE%BC%CE%AF%CE%B1_%CE%B3%CE%BB%CF%8E%CF%83%CF%83%CE%B1

Byzantine Yperpyra And Venetian Ducats: Missing Pieces In The Puzzle Of Monetary Theory

Standard

Paper published in Economic Alternatives journal, vol 12, no 3, pp. 419-434.

https://www.academia.edu/37859473/Byzantine_Yperpyra_And_Venetian_Ducats_Missing_Pieces_In_The_Puzzle_Of_Monetary_Theory

Abstract:

The paper stems from a greater project on economic history concerning the monetary system and policies of medieval and renaissance Venice, with a special focus on Venice’s colony of Crete. The Venetian monetary system included various currencies, both minted and virtual, and it was intertwined with the currencies that already existed or appeared in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Venetian imperial era. I examine actual historical examples through the lenses of both mainstream and heterodox monetary theories in order to show the complexity of monetary practices under real conditions and how the available monetary theories need further sophistication in order to explain and systemize our understanding of monetary phenomena.

To make the research inquiry clearer, I focus on two examples that seem to run counter to what current assumptions about monetary structures:
One case is that of the Byzantine yperpyron, a golden coin of the Eastern Roman Empire which seems to survive in Crete island, both the Venetian rule (starting in early 13th century) and the end of the Byzantine Empire itself (in 1453) and remained in circulation, mostly as a virtual currency or accounting unit, until 17th century, together with various other currencies circulating in the island.

The other case is the Venetian ducat itself, a golden coin minted by Venice from late 13th century onwards and well known for its quality of gold and value in international trade in both Mediterranean and Europe. Yet, it seems that the Venetians preferred to use other international currencies in domestic trade. There has been evidence that in some cases the never-debased golden ducat was not accepted in local transactions.

The paper attempts to set the grounds for further investigation and discussion concerning monetary phenomena and the issues those raise for monetary theory.

Keywords: Venice, Crete, monetary history, yperpyron, ducat, monetary theory
JEL Codes: B50, E42, N13, N23, P4, P5.